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Puggalavaggo

Andha Sutta

'Monks, there are three persons found existing in the world.

What three? The blind, the one-eyed, and the two-eyed.

And of what sort, monks, is the blind? Herein a certain person has not the eye to acquire wealth unattained, or to make the wealth he has increase. He has not the eye fit to see states that are good and bad, to see states that are blameworthy and praiseworthy states mean and exalted, states resembling light and darkness. This one, monks, is called "the blind."

And of what sort, monks, is the one-eyed? In this case a certain person has the eye to acquire wealth unattained, and or to make the wealth he has increase. But he has not the eye fit to see states that are good and bad, to see states that are blameworthy and praiseworthy states mean and exalted, states resembling light and darkness. This one is called the "one-eyed."

And of what sort, monks, is the two-eyed? In this case a certain person has both the eye to acquire wealth unattained and the eye to make the wealth he has increase, and the eye to see states that are good and bad, to see states that are blameworthy and praiseworthy, states mean and exalted, states resembling light and darkness. This one is called " the two-eyed."

These are the three persons: The blind, of sight bereft, hath no such wealth, No works good deeds, unlucky in both ways. And then again 'tis said the one-eyed man, conjoined with right and wrong, searches for wealth. With tricks and frauds and lies: worldly, purse-proud, and clever to gain wealth is he, and hence departing is afflicted sore in Hell. But best of all's the being with two eyes: His wealth, with right exertion rightly won, he gives away: with best intent, unwavering. In a blessed home he's born, nor sorrows there. So from the blind and one-eyed keep aloof, and join thyself to worthy two-eyed men.'

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